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january, 2020

2020fri24jan7:30 pm9:30 pmStanley Jordan - plays JIMI7:30 pm - 9:30 pm Maui Arts & Cultural Center, One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732 Event Organized By: Maui Arts and Cultural Center

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Event Details

Stanley Jordan – plays JIMI

Friday, Jan 24 2020, 7:30 PM

McCoy Studio Theater

Presented by Blues Bear Hawaii

Guitarist Stanley Jordan uses two hands to play each note in an advanced form of tapping that allows him to play melody and chords simultaneously.

A four-time Grammy nominee, Jordan has performed at many jazz events, including Kool Jazz Festival, Concord Jazz Festival, and the Montreux International Jazz Festival.

Come experience the touch technique of a master! The world-renowned guitarist presents a new live show called “Stanley Jordan Plays Jimi.”

This is a tribute show—but it’s not pure imitation. As Jordan explains it, “This is my fantasy Jimi Hendrix concert if Jimi were still alive and playing today. By re-imagining his music and channeling his persona, I try to bring that fantasy to life.”

This performance will be in a trio format, including Gary Kelly, a renowned bassist; and Kenwood Dennard, a percussion professor at the Berklee College of Music.

“A virtuosic tour de force. A truly original talent.” – Los Angeles Times

“There is something mighty special when a musician comes along and takes an instrument to a new level of performance.” – Chicago Tribune

“If you looked around the club, everyone had this vaguely amazed/starstruck/mesmerized/dreamy look as they watched Jordan play. You could’ve heard a pin drop – nobody wanted to miss a single note.” – The Panic Manual

“No one sounds like Stanley Jordan. He famously plays with both hands on the guitar fretboard, as though he were playing piano keys.” – Twin Cities Arts Reader

 

Time

(Friday) 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Location

Maui Arts & Cultural Center

One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732

Organizer

Maui Arts and Cultural Center808-242-ARTS (2787) One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732

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EXPLANATION OF HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE

Written Hawaiian uses two diacritical markings as pronunciation guides:

  • The ‘okina, which is typographically represented as a reversed apostrophe. In spoken Hawaiian, the ‘okina indicates a glottal stop, or clean break between vowels. If your browser supports this display (and it may not, depending on browser type and settings), an ‘okina should look like this: ‘. If browsing conditions do not support this display, you might be seeing a box, a blank space, or odd-looking character instead.
  • The kahako, or macron, which is typographically represented as a bar above the letter, as in ā (again, you will see it correctly only if your browser delivers it correctly). The macron on a vowel indicates increased duration in pronunciation of the vowel that it appears over.

Web browsers sometimes have difficulty reproducing these markings without the use of graphics, special fonts, or special coding. Even correctly authored Web pages that use Unicode coding may be transmitted through a server that displays the symbols incorrectly or the browser may use a replacement font that displays these incorrectly.

Since most browsers can and do display the ASCII grave symbol (‘) as coded, this site uses the grave symbol to represent the ‘okina. We do depict the correct ‘okina on all pages in the title graphic because it is embedded in the graphic and not displayed as text.

The kahako/macron is more problematic. Given the problems with displaying this with current technology, some websites resort to displaying these with diaeresis characters instead, as in ä, which will appear in most browsers (but not all) as an “a” with two dots over it. However, this is not a desirable solution because it doesn’t work uniformly in all browser situations. Until Unicode fonts are more universally displayable, the site reluctantly omits the kahako from most text.

For up-to-date information on how to display the Hawaiian language on websites, visit http://www.olelo.hawaii.edu/enehana/unicode.php by the Kualono Hawaiian Language Center of the University of Hawaii. General information on these issues can also be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E2%80%98Okina and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macron.

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