march, 2019

2019sun24mar3:00 pm5:00 pmRise of the Wahine: Champions of Title IX3:00 pm - 5:00 pm Maui Arts & Cultural Center, One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732 Event Organized By: Maui Arts and Cultural Center

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Event Details

Rise of the Wahine: Champions of Title IX
McCoy Studio Theater
Sunday, March 24, 2019 – 3:00 PM

This incredible true story of the rise of women in America will educate and inspire the next generation of leaders.

“Rise of the Wahine: Champions of Title IX” is an edge-of-your-seat David vs. Goliath tale of how culture is transformed and how to rise above the challenges in your life and bring an end to injustice in the world around you.

It reveals how, in the years following the Civil Rights movement and the passage of Title IX in 1972, a headstrong African American female coach, the first Asian American U.S. congresswoman, and the team captain of a rag-tag female volleyball team battled discrimination from the halls of Washington D.C. to the dusty volleyball courts of the University of Hawaii, fighting for the rights of young women to play sports.

Above all, the film reveals how change-makers overcome injustice with wisdom, an innovative spirit, and without becoming victims to their circumstances.

The screening is presented as part of Women’s History Month and will be followed by a discussion facilitated by Dean Kaneshiro, director/writer/producer of the film. Also participating is the film’s coproducer, Ryan Kalei Tsuji, and independent documentary filmmaker, Kimberlee Bassford.

CLICK HERE to watch the trailer

Tickets: $10 (plus applicable fees)

Tickets on sale Tuesday, February 12



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Time

(Sunday) 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Location

Maui Arts & Cultural Center

One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732

Organizer

Maui Arts and Cultural Center808-242-ARTS (2787) One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732

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EXPLANATION OF HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE

Written Hawaiian uses two diacritical markings as pronunciation guides:

  • The ‘okina, which is typographically represented as a reversed apostrophe. In spoken Hawaiian, the ‘okina indicates a glottal stop, or clean break between vowels. If your browser supports this display (and it may not, depending on browser type and settings), an ‘okina should look like this: ‘. If browsing conditions do not support this display, you might be seeing a box, a blank space, or odd-looking character instead.
  • The kahako, or macron, which is typographically represented as a bar above the letter, as in ā (again, you will see it correctly only if your browser delivers it correctly). The macron on a vowel indicates increased duration in pronunciation of the vowel that it appears over.

Web browsers sometimes have difficulty reproducing these markings without the use of graphics, special fonts, or special coding. Even correctly authored Web pages that use Unicode coding may be transmitted through a server that displays the symbols incorrectly or the browser may use a replacement font that displays these incorrectly.

Since most browsers can and do display the ASCII grave symbol (‘) as coded, this site uses the grave symbol to represent the ‘okina. We do depict the correct ‘okina on all pages in the title graphic because it is embedded in the graphic and not displayed as text.

The kahako/macron is more problematic. Given the problems with displaying this with current technology, some websites resort to displaying these with diaeresis characters instead, as in ä, which will appear in most browsers (but not all) as an “a” with two dots over it. However, this is not a desirable solution because it doesn’t work uniformly in all browser situations. Until Unicode fonts are more universally displayable, the site reluctantly omits the kahako from most text.

For up-to-date information on how to display the Hawaiian language on websites, visit http://www.olelo.hawaii.edu/enehana/unicode.php by the Kualono Hawaiian Language Center of the University of Hawaii. General information on these issues can also be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E2%80%98Okina and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macron.

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