april, 2019

This is a repeating event

2019fri19apr5:00 pm10:00 pmRay Jr. & Island 98.5 presents BASH 20195:00 pm - 10:00 pm Bishop Museum, 1525 Bernice Street Event Organized By: Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum

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Event Details

Ray Jr. & Island 98.5 presents BASH 2019
Friday April 19 & Saturday April 20th, 2019
5:00 pm – 10:00pm
The Great Lawn at Bishop Museum
TWO DAY LINEUP
·        JBOOG
·        TARRUS RILEY
·        SONS OF ZION
·        GENERAL FIYAH
·        REBEL SOULJAHZ
·        MAOLI
·        THREE HOUSES DOWN
·        TOMORROWS PEOPLE
·        JOHNNY SUITE
·        REMEDY VIBES
·        CITY BOYS

The museum will be closing its doors at 4:00pm, both days.

Doors 5:00pm ll Music 5:30pm ll All Ages Welcome

General Admission 2-Day Tickets:  $79 Presale

VIP  2-Day Tickets: $189

VIP includes Fast Pass entry, Official BASH 2019 lanyard / pass, Exclusive VIP Area and 1 complimentary drink by sponsor Anhueser Busch for both nights. (Must be 21+ to receive all VIP amenities)

To purchase tickets online visit: https://secure.tmrevents.net/#/event-details/bash-2019

Note: ONLY Two Day Passes will be sold to this event

FESTIVAL RULES

  • Rain or Shine
  • Line Up / Set times subject to change
  • Everyone subject to search upon entry
  • Bishop Museum is a NON Smoking venue.
  • The festival is all ages. Age 5 & under are free.

Time

(Friday) 5:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Location

Bishop Museum

1525 Bernice Street

Organizer

Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum808.847.3511 1525 Bernice Street Honolulu, Hawai‘i 96817

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EXPLANATION OF HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE

Written Hawaiian uses two diacritical markings as pronunciation guides:

  • The ‘okina, which is typographically represented as a reversed apostrophe. In spoken Hawaiian, the ‘okina indicates a glottal stop, or clean break between vowels. If your browser supports this display (and it may not, depending on browser type and settings), an ‘okina should look like this: ‘. If browsing conditions do not support this display, you might be seeing a box, a blank space, or odd-looking character instead.
  • The kahako, or macron, which is typographically represented as a bar above the letter, as in ā (again, you will see it correctly only if your browser delivers it correctly). The macron on a vowel indicates increased duration in pronunciation of the vowel that it appears over.

Web browsers sometimes have difficulty reproducing these markings without the use of graphics, special fonts, or special coding. Even correctly authored Web pages that use Unicode coding may be transmitted through a server that displays the symbols incorrectly or the browser may use a replacement font that displays these incorrectly.

Since most browsers can and do display the ASCII grave symbol (‘) as coded, this site uses the grave symbol to represent the ‘okina. We do depict the correct ‘okina on all pages in the title graphic because it is embedded in the graphic and not displayed as text.

The kahako/macron is more problematic. Given the problems with displaying this with current technology, some websites resort to displaying these with diaeresis characters instead, as in ä, which will appear in most browsers (but not all) as an “a” with two dots over it. However, this is not a desirable solution because it doesn’t work uniformly in all browser situations. Until Unicode fonts are more universally displayable, the site reluctantly omits the kahako from most text.

For up-to-date information on how to display the Hawaiian language on websites, visit http://www.olelo.hawaii.edu/enehana/unicode.php by the Kualono Hawaiian Language Center of the University of Hawaii. General information on these issues can also be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E2%80%98Okina and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macron.

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