march, 2019

2019wed20mar7:30 pm9:30 pm"Public Love" by Morgan Thorson & Collaborators7:30 pm - 9:30 pm Maui Arts & Cultural Center, One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732 Event Organized By: Maui Arts and Cultural Center

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Event Details

“Public Love” by Morgan Thorson & Collaborators
Castle Theater
Wednesday, March 20, 2019 – 7:30 PM

Morgan Thorson is a choreographer based in Minneapolis. She creates original dance works that combine movement, light, sound, and objects while taking into consideration the site of the work, representation of the body, and history of the field. Her work has been described as having “an explosive physicality tempered by sinuous lines and subtle drama.” (Minneapolis Star Tribune)

In “Public Love,” Thorson and her team of dance artists create an intervention on contemporary western dance culture. “Public Love” investigates a shift from top-down power dynamics in dance. It embraces and publicly expresses the tactile energy of this intimate collective and explores the audience’s gaze as a form of soulful touch.

Dancers include Jessica Cressey, Non Edwards, Allie Hankins, Sam Johnson, Alanna Morris-Van Tassel, and Valerie Oliveiro, with original sound by Alan Sparhawk (of LOW), light design by Elaine Buckholt, and costumes by Trevor Bowen.

“Public Love” is a National Performance Network/Visual Artist Network (NPN/VAN) Creation & Development Fund Project co-commissioned by Walker Art Center in partnership with Maui Arts & Cultural Center and NPN/VAN. The Creation & Development Fund is supported by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts (a federal agency). For more information: www.npnweb.org.

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Maui Arts and Cultural Center808-242-ARTS (2787) One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732

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EXPLANATION OF HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE

Written Hawaiian uses two diacritical markings as pronunciation guides:

  • The ‘okina, which is typographically represented as a reversed apostrophe. In spoken Hawaiian, the ‘okina indicates a glottal stop, or clean break between vowels. If your browser supports this display (and it may not, depending on browser type and settings), an ‘okina should look like this: ‘. If browsing conditions do not support this display, you might be seeing a box, a blank space, or odd-looking character instead.
  • The kahako, or macron, which is typographically represented as a bar above the letter, as in ā (again, you will see it correctly only if your browser delivers it correctly). The macron on a vowel indicates increased duration in pronunciation of the vowel that it appears over.

Web browsers sometimes have difficulty reproducing these markings without the use of graphics, special fonts, or special coding. Even correctly authored Web pages that use Unicode coding may be transmitted through a server that displays the symbols incorrectly or the browser may use a replacement font that displays these incorrectly.

Since most browsers can and do display the ASCII grave symbol (‘) as coded, this site uses the grave symbol to represent the ‘okina. We do depict the correct ‘okina on all pages in the title graphic because it is embedded in the graphic and not displayed as text.

The kahako/macron is more problematic. Given the problems with displaying this with current technology, some websites resort to displaying these with diaeresis characters instead, as in ä, which will appear in most browsers (but not all) as an “a” with two dots over it. However, this is not a desirable solution because it doesn’t work uniformly in all browser situations. Until Unicode fonts are more universally displayable, the site reluctantly omits the kahako from most text.

For up-to-date information on how to display the Hawaiian language on websites, visit http://www.olelo.hawaii.edu/enehana/unicode.php by the Kualono Hawaiian Language Center of the University of Hawaii. General information on these issues can also be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E2%80%98Okina and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macron.

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