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january, 2020

2020fri03jan6:45 pm8:45 pmOld Dominion6:45 pm - 8:45 pm Maui Arts & Cultural Center, One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732 Event Organized By: Maui Arts and Cultural Center

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Event Details

Old Dominion
A&B Amphitheater

Friday, January 3, 2020 – 6:45 PM

Gates open at 5:30 pm

Two-time CMA and ACM Vocal Group of the Year, Old Dominion, has emerged as one of the hottest bands in country music, fusing clever lyrics and an infectious sound. They recently won their second CMA Award for Vocal Group of the Year. Proving that they are not your average country band, Old Dominion blends old-fashioned country charm, lyrical wit, and rock n’ roll grit into radio-friendly, hook-heavy pop nuggets. Old Dominion recently debuted No. 1 on the Top Country Albums chart with their self-titled third album – the largest streaming album debut by a country band this year with 13.7 million on-demand audio streams. Their current, Top-5-and-climbing second single, “One Man Band,” was released as a fan favorite with more than 127 million streams. The first single “Make It Sweet” reached No. 1 on Billboard Country Airplay and Country Aircheck/Mediabase charts, making it Old Dominion’s seventh No. 1 song.

Old Dominion’s sophomore album, Happy Endings, debuted at #1 on the Billboard Country Albums chart and #7 on the Billboard Top 200. Their latest single, “Make It Sweet,” follows the success of previous singles, “No Such Thing As A Broken Heart,” “Written in the Sand,” and “Hotel Key,” all of which hit #1 on Billboard Country Airplay and Mediabase charts.

To top it off, each and every single the band has released has been certified Platinum by the RIAA. In 2016, the band was notably named ACM New Group of the Year, ACCA Breakthrough Group of the Year, AIMP Songwriter Artist of the Year, and Music Row Breakthrough Artist of the Year.

Old Dominion consists of lead singer Matthew Ramsey, lead guitarist Brad Tursi, multi-instrumentalist Trevor Rosen, bassist Geoff Sprung, and drummer Whit Sellers. With special guest, Morgan Evans.

Tickets: $45 (General Admission), $55, $65, $85, $125 (Gold Circle) (plus applicable fees)
Gold Circle seats include premium seating and exclusive access to the Yokouchi Pavilion bars and restrooms.

Parking in the MACC lot available for sale via the MACC Box Office. CLICK HERE to purchase online.

Time

(Friday) 6:45 pm - 8:45 pm

Location

Maui Arts & Cultural Center

One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732

Organizer

Maui Arts and Cultural Center808-242-ARTS (2787) One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732

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EXPLANATION OF HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE

Written Hawaiian uses two diacritical markings as pronunciation guides:

  • The ‘okina, which is typographically represented as a reversed apostrophe. In spoken Hawaiian, the ‘okina indicates a glottal stop, or clean break between vowels. If your browser supports this display (and it may not, depending on browser type and settings), an ‘okina should look like this: ‘. If browsing conditions do not support this display, you might be seeing a box, a blank space, or odd-looking character instead.
  • The kahako, or macron, which is typographically represented as a bar above the letter, as in ā (again, you will see it correctly only if your browser delivers it correctly). The macron on a vowel indicates increased duration in pronunciation of the vowel that it appears over.

Web browsers sometimes have difficulty reproducing these markings without the use of graphics, special fonts, or special coding. Even correctly authored Web pages that use Unicode coding may be transmitted through a server that displays the symbols incorrectly or the browser may use a replacement font that displays these incorrectly.

Since most browsers can and do display the ASCII grave symbol (‘) as coded, this site uses the grave symbol to represent the ‘okina. We do depict the correct ‘okina on all pages in the title graphic because it is embedded in the graphic and not displayed as text.

The kahako/macron is more problematic. Given the problems with displaying this with current technology, some websites resort to displaying these with diaeresis characters instead, as in ä, which will appear in most browsers (but not all) as an “a” with two dots over it. However, this is not a desirable solution because it doesn’t work uniformly in all browser situations. Until Unicode fonts are more universally displayable, the site reluctantly omits the kahako from most text.

For up-to-date information on how to display the Hawaiian language on websites, visit http://www.olelo.hawaii.edu/enehana/unicode.php by the Kualono Hawaiian Language Center of the University of Hawaii. General information on these issues can also be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E2%80%98Okina and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macron.

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