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may, 2019

2019thu02may7:30 pm9:30 pmMichael Franti & Spearhead7:30 pm - 9:30 pm Maui Arts & Cultural Center, One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732 Event Organized By: Maui Arts and Cultural Center

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Event Details

Michael Franti & Spearhead
Castle Theater
Thursday, May 2, 2019 – 7:30 PM
Opening the show is Jungle Man Sam

Michael Franti is a musician, singer-songwriter, filmmaker, and humanitarian who is recognized as a pioneering force in the music industry.

Long known for his globally conscious lyrics, powerful performances, and dynamic live shows, Franti has continually been at the forefront of lyrical activism, using his music as a positive force for change.

Franti believes that there is a great battle taking place in the world today between cynicism and optimism, so he made his most recent album, Stay Human Vol. II, to remind himself and anyone else who’s listening, that there is still good in the world and that it is worth fighting for. The album soared to the top of the charts, including #1 on Billboard’s Independent Album Sales and #1 on iTunes Top Albums.

“I make music because I believe it can change people’s lives and make a difference in the world,” enthuses Franti. “Music gives us new energy and a stronger sense of purpose.”

He and his band Spearhead, known for their authentic and uplifting music, have found global success with multiplatinum songs like “Say Hey (I Love You)” and the chart-breaking 2010 release, “The Sound of Sunshine.” Franti and his band guarantee a show that will be thought-provoking as well as energetic.

Opening Act:  JUNGLE MAN SAM

CLICK HERE for “The Sound of Sunshine” video

CLICK HERE for the menu

Tickets: $29.50, $39.50, $49.50 (plus applicable fees; ticket prices increase on day of show)

Age: All ages

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Time

(Thursday) 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Location

Maui Arts & Cultural Center

One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732

Organizer

Maui Arts and Cultural Center808-242-ARTS (2787) One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732

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EXPLANATION OF HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE

Written Hawaiian uses two diacritical markings as pronunciation guides:

  • The ‘okina, which is typographically represented as a reversed apostrophe. In spoken Hawaiian, the ‘okina indicates a glottal stop, or clean break between vowels. If your browser supports this display (and it may not, depending on browser type and settings), an ‘okina should look like this: ‘. If browsing conditions do not support this display, you might be seeing a box, a blank space, or odd-looking character instead.
  • The kahako, or macron, which is typographically represented as a bar above the letter, as in ā (again, you will see it correctly only if your browser delivers it correctly). The macron on a vowel indicates increased duration in pronunciation of the vowel that it appears over.

Web browsers sometimes have difficulty reproducing these markings without the use of graphics, special fonts, or special coding. Even correctly authored Web pages that use Unicode coding may be transmitted through a server that displays the symbols incorrectly or the browser may use a replacement font that displays these incorrectly.

Since most browsers can and do display the ASCII grave symbol (‘) as coded, this site uses the grave symbol to represent the ‘okina. We do depict the correct ‘okina on all pages in the title graphic because it is embedded in the graphic and not displayed as text.

The kahako/macron is more problematic. Given the problems with displaying this with current technology, some websites resort to displaying these with diaeresis characters instead, as in ä, which will appear in most browsers (but not all) as an “a” with two dots over it. However, this is not a desirable solution because it doesn’t work uniformly in all browser situations. Until Unicode fonts are more universally displayable, the site reluctantly omits the kahako from most text.

For up-to-date information on how to display the Hawaiian language on websites, visit http://www.olelo.hawaii.edu/enehana/unicode.php by the Kualono Hawaiian Language Center of the University of Hawaii. General information on these issues can also be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E2%80%98Okina and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macron.

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