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march, 2019

2019fri01mar7:30 pm9:30 pmCorinne Bailey Rae7:30 pm - 9:30 pm Maui Arts & Cultural Center, One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732 Event Organized By: Maui Arts and Cultural Center

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Event Details

Corinne Bailey Rae
Castle Theater

GET TICKETS

Friday, March 1, 2019 – 7:30 PM

With Special Guest Mike Love

From Leeds, England, singer/songwriter/musician Corinne Bailey Rae shot to stardom with her self-titled #1 UK debut album in 2006, featuring the global hits “Put Your Records On“ and “Like A Star”.

Bailey Rae has received two Grammy Awards, two MOBOS (the UK’s Music of Black Origin awards), alongside multiple nominations including BRIT and BET Awards. She was awarded her first Grammy in 2008 for Album of the Year when featured on Herbie Hancock’s River: The Joni Letters.  Her second album, The Sea(2010) was nominated for the prestigious Mercury Music Prize. The subsequent EP Is This Love garnered a Grammy for Best R&B Performance.

Bailey Rae returned in 2016 with “boundary-defying, epic music” (NPR) for her third studio album, The Heart Speaks in Whispers, also declared “the best R&B of 2016” (The Guardian). The album featured the stunning “Green Aphrodisiac” named one of the “10 best R&B songs of 2016” (Billboard) and selected by President Obama for his summer playlist. The new songs soared in her live performances as Bailey Rae embarked on a worldwide tour, including festivals and a special guest appearance for Stevie Wonder’s BST Hyde Park London concert.

Bailey Rae continues to collaborate and perform with artists across musical genres, including Mary J Blige, Al Green, Herbie Hancock, KING, Paul McCartney, Kele Okereke (Bloc Party), the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Questlove, Salaam Rami, RZA, Tyler The Creator, Paul Weller, Stevie Wonder, Tracey Thorn, Logic, Mick Jenkins, and many more!

CLICK HERE to see a live performance of her hit, “Put Your Records On”

CLICK HERE for a video about Corinne’s Hawai’i debut!

CLICK HERE for the menu

Tickets: $35, $55, $75, $125 (plus applicable fees)

Time

(Friday) 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Location

Maui Arts & Cultural Center

One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732

Organizer

Maui Arts and Cultural Center808-242-ARTS (2787) One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732

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EXPLANATION OF HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE

Written Hawaiian uses two diacritical markings as pronunciation guides:

  • The ‘okina, which is typographically represented as a reversed apostrophe. In spoken Hawaiian, the ‘okina indicates a glottal stop, or clean break between vowels. If your browser supports this display (and it may not, depending on browser type and settings), an ‘okina should look like this: ‘. If browsing conditions do not support this display, you might be seeing a box, a blank space, or odd-looking character instead.
  • The kahako, or macron, which is typographically represented as a bar above the letter, as in ā (again, you will see it correctly only if your browser delivers it correctly). The macron on a vowel indicates increased duration in pronunciation of the vowel that it appears over.

Web browsers sometimes have difficulty reproducing these markings without the use of graphics, special fonts, or special coding. Even correctly authored Web pages that use Unicode coding may be transmitted through a server that displays the symbols incorrectly or the browser may use a replacement font that displays these incorrectly.

Since most browsers can and do display the ASCII grave symbol (‘) as coded, this site uses the grave symbol to represent the ‘okina. We do depict the correct ‘okina on all pages in the title graphic because it is embedded in the graphic and not displayed as text.

The kahako/macron is more problematic. Given the problems with displaying this with current technology, some websites resort to displaying these with diaeresis characters instead, as in ä, which will appear in most browsers (but not all) as an “a” with two dots over it. However, this is not a desirable solution because it doesn’t work uniformly in all browser situations. Until Unicode fonts are more universally displayable, the site reluctantly omits the kahako from most text.

For up-to-date information on how to display the Hawaiian language on websites, visit http://www.olelo.hawaii.edu/enehana/unicode.php by the Kualono Hawaiian Language Center of the University of Hawaii. General information on these issues can also be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E2%80%98Okina and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macron.

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