march, 2019

2019sat23mar7:30 pm9:30 pmAna Vidović7:30 pm - 9:30 pm Maui Arts & Cultural Center, One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732 Event Organized By: Maui Arts and Cultural Center

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Event Details

Ana Vidović
McCoy Studio Theater
Saturday, March 23, 2019 – 7:30 PM

Ana Vidović is one of the youngest virtuoso guitarists in the world. She was born in Croatia and started playing guitar at the age of five. By age 11 she was performing internationally, and at 13 became the youngest student to attend the prestigious National Musical Academy in Zagreb.

Her reputation in Europe led to an invitation to study with Manuel Barrueco at the Peabody Conservatory where she graduated in 2005. Vidović is an extraordinary talent with formidable gifts taking her place amongst the elite musicians of the world today.

Ms. Vidovic continues to broaden her repertoire and captivates audiences around the world with her global tours. She has won an impressive number of prizes and international competitions, including first prizes in the Albert Augustine International Competition in Bath, England; the Fernando Sor competition in Rome, Italy; and the Francisco Tarrega competition in Benicasim, Spain.

CLICK HERE to view the evening’s program

CLICK HERE for the menu

Tickets: $45 (plus applicable fees); 10% discount for MACC members and half-price kids 12 and under



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Time

(Saturday) 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Location

Maui Arts & Cultural Center

One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732

Organizer

Maui Arts and Cultural Center808-242-ARTS (2787) One Cameron Way Kahului, HI 96732

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EXPLANATION OF HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE

Written Hawaiian uses two diacritical markings as pronunciation guides:

  • The ‘okina, which is typographically represented as a reversed apostrophe. In spoken Hawaiian, the ‘okina indicates a glottal stop, or clean break between vowels. If your browser supports this display (and it may not, depending on browser type and settings), an ‘okina should look like this: ‘. If browsing conditions do not support this display, you might be seeing a box, a blank space, or odd-looking character instead.
  • The kahako, or macron, which is typographically represented as a bar above the letter, as in ā (again, you will see it correctly only if your browser delivers it correctly). The macron on a vowel indicates increased duration in pronunciation of the vowel that it appears over.

Web browsers sometimes have difficulty reproducing these markings without the use of graphics, special fonts, or special coding. Even correctly authored Web pages that use Unicode coding may be transmitted through a server that displays the symbols incorrectly or the browser may use a replacement font that displays these incorrectly.

Since most browsers can and do display the ASCII grave symbol (‘) as coded, this site uses the grave symbol to represent the ‘okina. We do depict the correct ‘okina on all pages in the title graphic because it is embedded in the graphic and not displayed as text.

The kahako/macron is more problematic. Given the problems with displaying this with current technology, some websites resort to displaying these with diaeresis characters instead, as in ä, which will appear in most browsers (but not all) as an “a” with two dots over it. However, this is not a desirable solution because it doesn’t work uniformly in all browser situations. Until Unicode fonts are more universally displayable, the site reluctantly omits the kahako from most text.

For up-to-date information on how to display the Hawaiian language on websites, visit http://www.olelo.hawaii.edu/enehana/unicode.php by the Kualono Hawaiian Language Center of the University of Hawaii. General information on these issues can also be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E2%80%98Okina and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macron.

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